Building Big Arms

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Most men seem to fall into one of two camps when it comes to arm workouts:

Guys who do chin-ups (complex exercises that work multiple muscles), and guys who do curls (isolation exercises targeting a single group).

Complex movements are functional and great for people beginner and intermediate lifters, but may not deliver the pure muscle size you want. On the other hand, isolation exercises are great for hypertrophy but not function, meaning they’ll pack on some muscle, but won’t necessarily help your total body strength. Combine the two, and you get the best of both worlds.

Look at your isolation exercises and complex movements as lobster and steak: Each is good on their own, but together they’re unstoppable. Workouts that have curls and chin-ups, or bench presses and tricep pushdowns, are more likely to deliver both the size and strength you’re looking for.

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Building Muscle on a Calorie Deficit

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Because the human body is designed to sacrifice muscle when losing weight as a survival mechanism, only a certain body type will permit the simultaneous growth of muscle and loss of overall mass. If you’re significantly overweight, your body may be able to support increased muscle mass even on a caloric deficit, provided it has less fat to maintain. If you’re relatively lean and/or muscular, however, it is much more difficult for your body to increase muscle mass while experiencing a caloric deficit.

While a caloric deficit implies that you’re eating less food overall, it is possible to increase your protein intake during a caloric deficit by adjusting your diet to include more protein-rich foods. To succeed in building muscle and losing weight simultaneously, consume 1.6 g of protein per kilogram of bodyweight daily. To meet this goal, you’ll likely have to rely heavily on protein sources, such as meat, fish, beans, eggs and tofu. You may also consider a powdered protein supplement.

To build muscle while losing weight, you’ll have to train with a high degree of intensity. Since the body’s natural inclination is to sacrifice muscle when losing weight, training is the only way to provide a stimulus that lets your body know that muscle is needed. To maximize this stimulus, focus of heavy, compound exercises, such as the bench press, shoulder press, bent-over row, squat and deadlift. For each exercise, perform three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions for maximum muscular hypertrophy potential.

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Carbs go First and Fats Second

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Primarily Carbohydrates

The first fuel that your body breaks down for energy is carbohydrates. After a meal, your body is in the “fed” state and preferentially breaks down carbohydrates since they are easily accessible and turned into energy. After your body has used up the carbohydrates from a meal or snack, your cells begin to break down glucose stored in your muscles and liver known as glycogen. Glycogen stores vary in each person, but are typically depleted within 24 hours, meaning your body has to begin breaking down other compounds for energy.

Fat Preferentially Metabolized

When glucose and glycogen are not available, your body preferentially breaks down fatty compounds known as triacylglycerols which are present in adipose or fat tissue. Because fat is a high-energy source with nine calories per gram, fat provides an efficient fuel source. Additionally, your body metabolically prefers to preserve lean body mass and, when possible, breaks down fat stores for fuel as much as possible. Only when your fat stores are extremely low or depleted does your body have to then break down protein.

Muscle Breakdown

When glucose and fat stores are depleted, your body will then turn to muscle to break down into individual amino acids for energy. Unlike carbohydrates and fat, your body does not store amino acids, which is why muscle breakdown is the only way to release amino acids for fuel. In typical conditions where you are eating on a regular basis, your body will not use muscle for energy. Typically, protein is used for fuel only in a starvation state. Because you need muscle tissue to survive and move, the natural tendency of metabolism is to spare muscle tissue and break down carbohydrates and fat first.

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Lateral plyometric

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Lateral plyometric jumps are advanced exercises that can be used to develop power and agility. The vast majority of athletes perform workouts and exercises that focus on forward motion, but it’s also important for athletes to include exercises that target powerful, and stable, lateral motion exercises as well.

If you play a sport that incorporates any sort of side-to-side movements, practicing these moves during training is crucial.

Lateral movements not only improve strength, stability and coordination, they also help reduce the risk of injuries by enhancing balance and proprioception through the whole body.

They improve overall hip, knee and ankle joint stability. Lateral drills also help build more balanced strength in the muscles of the lower body, including the hip abductors and adductors.

These lateral drills will improve sports performance, and reduce the risk for sports injuries, particularly for athletes who frequently, or abruptly, change direction, cut or pivot. Athletes who benefit the most from side-to-side agility drills are those who play field and court sports (soccer, basketball, football, rugby and tennis), as well as skiers, skaters, gymnasts, and even rock climbers.

Athletes need to maintain power, control and balance during fast side-to-side lateral motion and transitions.

In general, an athlete can generate power in two ways: (1) using his own body weight, or (2) pushing or throwing something heavy.

Plyometric movements are one of the easiest and most effective ways for athletes to generate and increase power. The lateral plyometric jump is one exercise that primarily uses an athlete’s body weight to generate power.

Before doing the lateral plyometric jumps, a good place for athletes to begin building lower body power is by doing simple agility drills (such as ladder drills and dot drills) then slowly build up to tuck jumps. Other good additions to the plyometric routine include: all-out sprints, stair running/bounding, and burpees.

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Core

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In everyday activities and exercise, balance and stability matter. Core strength training improves both. Core strength training not only works the muscles in the hips, abdomen and back, it also trains them to all work and function together. It builds coordination between these muscles, and working together balances and stabilizes your body.

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BFit Client of the Year 2011 (Carl Wendt)

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Carl Carlos Wendt has lost 24 kilos / 53 pounds in the last 5 months of his training.
18% body fat lose in 5 months. Power and performance increase by double.

I’m proud to have Carl as my Bfit client of the year for 2011. Give me 10 more clients like Carl and I would be the luckiest trainer in the world. Carls life has changed for the better. His results are only going to get even better as more time goes on. Watch his 1 year update in time to come.
Congrats Carl!!

2011 Results
Before weight 130kg After weight 106kg
Before body fat 36.1% After body fat 18.5%

Carl’s Performance:
Beginning Bench Max 70kg
Present Bench Max 140kg

2 Min Tests:
Before After
Pushups-21 / 82
Situps-22 / 58
Burpees-19 / 55

1 Lap around Merrylands oval
Approximately 400meters

Before 2min 45.48 seconds After 1min 5.25seconds
Improvement of 1 min and 40 seconds!!

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BFit Personal Trainer Profile

Brief bio:
Steve is a former soldier and has served his country. His training methods and ideologies are at the highest level. Anyone in the Surrey, B.C location looking for a personal trainer. Who is  advanced and way above average of a typical personal trainer. Look no further. 

Steve Sandu

About Steve Sandu
My name is Steve Sandu certified B.C personal trainer and a proud member of Bruno fitness,semi pro body builder, I am (Height) 6’2 (Weight) 215lbs.I have over 14 years experience in personal fitness,I started out young back in junior high school and liked the feeling that it gave me that extra edge and confidence boost.Fitness is a life style change.if you are looking for a quick fix then I’m not the guy for you.I want to help those who really want to change there life style for the better and feel healthier live longer and feel more vital for the long term.I have experienced it all with my weight I understand how it’s like to be very thin and scrawny and also know the flip side of being very large and muscular to even a point in my life where I had some extra unhealthy weight as well.So when I say I understand where you are coming from I’ve been there and will do my best to help you reach your fitness goals or your money back,this is my SS guarantee.Strong trainer=Strong results.

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