Building Big Arms

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Most men seem to fall into one of two camps when it comes to arm workouts:

Guys who do chin-ups (complex exercises that work multiple muscles), and guys who do curls (isolation exercises targeting a single group).

Complex movements are functional and great for people beginner and intermediate lifters, but may not deliver the pure muscle size you want. On the other hand, isolation exercises are great for hypertrophy but not function, meaning they’ll pack on some muscle, but won’t necessarily help your total body strength. Combine the two, and you get the best of both worlds.

Look at your isolation exercises and complex movements as lobster and steak: Each is good on their own, but together they’re unstoppable. Workouts that have curls and chin-ups, or bench presses and tricep pushdowns, are more likely to deliver both the size and strength you’re looking for.

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Building Muscle on a Calorie Deficit

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Because the human body is designed to sacrifice muscle when losing weight as a survival mechanism, only a certain body type will permit the simultaneous growth of muscle and loss of overall mass. If you’re significantly overweight, your body may be able to support increased muscle mass even on a caloric deficit, provided it has less fat to maintain. If you’re relatively lean and/or muscular, however, it is much more difficult for your body to increase muscle mass while experiencing a caloric deficit.

While a caloric deficit implies that you’re eating less food overall, it is possible to increase your protein intake during a caloric deficit by adjusting your diet to include more protein-rich foods. To succeed in building muscle and losing weight simultaneously, consume 1.6 g of protein per kilogram of bodyweight daily. To meet this goal, you’ll likely have to rely heavily on protein sources, such as meat, fish, beans, eggs and tofu. You may also consider a powdered protein supplement.

To build muscle while losing weight, you’ll have to train with a high degree of intensity. Since the body’s natural inclination is to sacrifice muscle when losing weight, training is the only way to provide a stimulus that lets your body know that muscle is needed. To maximize this stimulus, focus of heavy, compound exercises, such as the bench press, shoulder press, bent-over row, squat and deadlift. For each exercise, perform three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions for maximum muscular hypertrophy potential.

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Muscle Soreness

The mild muscle strain injury creates microscopic damage to the muscle fibers. Scientists believe this damage, coupled with the inflammation that accompanies these tears, causes the pain.

“The aches and pains should be minor,” says Carol Torgan, an exercise physiologist and fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, “and are simply indications that muscles are adapting to your fitness regimen.”

No one is immune to muscle soreness. Exercise neophytes and body builders alike experience delayed onset muscle soreness.

“Anyone can get cramps or DOMS, from weekend warriors to elite athletes,” says Torgan. “The muscle discomfort is simply a symptom of using your muscles and placing stresses on them that are leading to adaptations to make them stronger and better able to perform the task the next time.”

But for the deconditioned person starting out, this can be intimidating. People starting an exercise program need guidance, Torgan says.

“The big problem is with people that aren’t very fit and go out and try these things; they get all excited to start a new class and the instructors don’t tell them that they might get sore,” she says.

“To them they might feel very sore, and because they aren’t familiar with it, they might worry that they’ve hurt themselves. Then they won’t want to do it again.”

Letting them know it’s OK to be sore may help them work through that first few days without being discouraged.

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Squats vs Leg Press

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The squat, known as the granddaddy of all bodybuilding exercises, simultaneously works more major muscles than any other resistance-training movement. The quadriceps (quads), hamstrings and gluteus maximus (glutes) are specifically targeted, while the hip and torso muscles are incorporated for stabilization and to assist the primary muscles. You can see why many experts in weight training consider the squat to be a whole-body exercise, even though you utilize it as a lower-body move.

Stabilizer muscles are smaller—and often less visible—muscles called upon during free-weight exercises to provide support and prevent unwanted movement. To perform the squat safely and effectively, the abdominal muscles (including the rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques and the transverse abdominis) and spinal erectors of the lower back contract isometrically to hold the torso in place as movement occurs at the hips and knees. Likewise, the hip muscles contract to hold the hip girdle stationary, allowing only the desired movement (hip flexion and extension).

The squat range of motion (ROM) about the knee and hip joints is relatively large. Increased ROM translates into greater muscle activation and ultimately into superior muscle development. In particular, the wide ROM at the hip is what notably differentiates the squat from the leg press.

LEG PRESS BENEFITS
Leg press apparatus provides proper positioning and safety.

Maximal weight can be used to overload the target muscle group (quads).

Minimal stabilizer and assistant muscle involvement increases emphasis on the quads.

Limited involvement of glutes and hamstrings leads to concentrated quad development.

Foot plate allows you to shift the emphasis on the leg muscles by changing foot position.

SQUAT BENEFITS
Greater hip range of motion (ROM) enhances hamstring and glute development.

Increased stabilizer and assistant muscle involvement improves overall strength and mass.

Hip adductor (inner thigh) involvement contributes to overall leg size.

No specialized equipment or apparatus required.

More bang for the buck: You target several leg and torso muscles with one exercise.

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Group Training

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What we offer at BFit…

Power endurance is the “holy grail” of athletic performance – so why not train like an athlete and reap the same benefits?

Some other benefits of BFit training include:

– Calorie Incinerator. Burn calories at a more efficient pace.

– Killer ab & core workouts.

– Builds functional strength. Real world, manly strength. You will develop a grip like a vice, shoulders like a lumberjack and the core of a gymnast.

– Low impact training. Minimal stress is placed on the joints, with all the force applied to the muscular system.

– Athletic Performance. Trains the neuromuscular system to apply force that begins at the core and extends through the extremities (both arms and legs) – a must for improving performance.

– Psychological training. It hurts, then it hurts some more. Push past those barriers and see what you are truly made of.

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Running shoes are for running, not for Deadlifting

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Most running shoes are shock-absorbers with air or gel-filling. Their soles compress to absorb impact forces when you run. This can be helpful for running, but not for Deadlifting. Running shoes will compress when you Deadlift. And they’ll compress differently on every rep. You can’t control or predict where the bar goes. Your form is inconsistent which increases the risk of injury. Test the difference by taking your running shoes off and Deadlifting a set barefoot. You’ll instantly have better bar control because you removed the compressible sole between your feet and the floor. You’ll have better Deadlift form because the bar moves the same way on each rep. Better form increases the effectiveness of the movement. It increases your Deadlift while decreasing the risk of lower back injury. The best shoes for Deadlifts have soles that don’t compress under the weight. Hard soles that behave the same way on each rep so you control where the bar goes. Flat soles that put you close to the floor to decrease the distance you pull the bar to lockout. Soles with great traction so your feet don’t slip. To solve this problem get your hands on a pair of Olympic Weight Lifting Shoes.

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AB EXERCISES USING WEIGHTS

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When you train your chest, your back, your arms, your legs, and everything else, for that matter, you use weights to properly develop the muscle targeted. But when it comes to abs, many people ditch the weights and go crazy doing countless numbers of crunches.

Start doing loaded abdominal work. You’ll feel a dramatic difference in the stimulus.

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