Sports Performance Coach

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Offering one on one coaching for athletes and everyday people who want a challenge and the truth into achieving realistic long term results. I have a cabinet filled with trophies and medals from various sports. So I know exactly what it takes to reach goals and results.

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Running shoes are for running, not for Deadlifting

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Most running shoes are shock-absorbers with air or gel-filling. Their soles compress to absorb impact forces when you run. This can be helpful for running, but not for Deadlifting. Running shoes will compress when you Deadlift. And they’ll compress differently on every rep. You can’t control or predict where the bar goes. Your form is inconsistent which increases the risk of injury. Test the difference by taking your running shoes off and Deadlifting a set barefoot. You’ll instantly have better bar control because you removed the compressible sole between your feet and the floor. You’ll have better Deadlift form because the bar moves the same way on each rep. Better form increases the effectiveness of the movement. It increases your Deadlift while decreasing the risk of lower back injury. The best shoes for Deadlifts have soles that don’t compress under the weight. Hard soles that behave the same way on each rep so you control where the bar goes. Flat soles that put you close to the floor to decrease the distance you pull the bar to lockout. Soles with great traction so your feet don’t slip. To solve this problem get your hands on a pair of Olympic Weight Lifting Shoes.

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More Weight Means Bigger Muscles Myth

Bruno Body

Some guys focus solely on pushing the weight in their sessions. This is because they think there is a strict correlation between the amount of weight lifted and an increase in muscular size… and for many guys, the size of muscles like the biceps and pectorals is the point of bodybuilding.

This is not always the case. The fact of the matter is that regardless of what you do in the gym, you can’t build more muscle tissue out of nothing. If you aren’t eating more than enough of the nutrients that your body needs to maintain itself and to build the new muscle tissue, you aren’t going to get bigger — no matter how heavy the weights you lift are. It’s that simple.

Now, contrary to the point above, others think that if size is their goal, then life should become a 24-hour buffet. They eat everything and anything in sight, in the hopes that it will help spark new muscle growth.

What these individuals need to realize is that, yes, they do require more calories, however, the body can only assimilate so many of those extra calories into lean muscle tissue. After that, the remainder will go toward fat mass. Your P-ratio is what determines the amount of surplus calories going to fat and the amount going toward lean muscle mass. Your P-ratio is partly influenced by genetic make-up — which is something you can’t change — but the changeable factors that affect are your workout program, your nutritional intake and the timing of your meals.

So if size is your goal, you need to make sure that you are eating enough to get growth in the first place, but not so much that with the additional muscle mass, you get a great deal of fat mass as well.

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