YOU CAN STILL BUILD MUSCLE WITH HIGH REPS

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The fact that training and nutrition give us the illusion of control is what causes so much controversy in the muscle industry. There is a lot of room for speculations. Genetics + nutrition + training are the back door of the muscle gurus. Whenever their bullshit ideas fail, they explain it with one of the three, while presenting drug loaded lifters as success examples.

Obviously, different professional bodybuilders train differently. Some prefer high volume while others say low volume is best. Some say high carb diets are best while others use low carb diets to get ripped. Whatever the case, there is one thing bodybuilders always agree on – drugs make you grow. However, when we are talking about drug free bodybuilding ( I mean real drug free bodybuilding) there is little that can be done as far as muscle mass is concerned.

As a natural you can get strong, you can get ripped, you can develop some serious physical skills, but growth will always be pathetic compared to the 200 lbs shredded guys pushed in your face. You can try many different diets and routines, but in the end you will always hit the wall. I learned that by doing exactly that – wondering like a moron in Wonderland and following the ideas of some muscle prophets, who never tell the truth.

To summarize:

You can build muscle with high reps (at least 60% of 1 RM – anything less does not provide sufficient intensity).
You can build muscle with low reps (85% of 1 RM).

You can use both methods – a few heavy sets followed by light sets.
In all three cases, you will end up at the same place.

There are many ways to fill a bottle, but once it’s full – it’s full.

Reference:
Nattyornot.com

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Lateral plyometric

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Lateral plyometric jumps are advanced exercises that can be used to develop power and agility. The vast majority of athletes perform workouts and exercises that focus on forward motion, but it’s also important for athletes to include exercises that target powerful, and stable, lateral motion exercises as well.

If you play a sport that incorporates any sort of side-to-side movements, practicing these moves during training is crucial.

Lateral movements not only improve strength, stability and coordination, they also help reduce the risk of injuries by enhancing balance and proprioception through the whole body.

They improve overall hip, knee and ankle joint stability. Lateral drills also help build more balanced strength in the muscles of the lower body, including the hip abductors and adductors.

These lateral drills will improve sports performance, and reduce the risk for sports injuries, particularly for athletes who frequently, or abruptly, change direction, cut or pivot. Athletes who benefit the most from side-to-side agility drills are those who play field and court sports (soccer, basketball, football, rugby and tennis), as well as skiers, skaters, gymnasts, and even rock climbers.

Athletes need to maintain power, control and balance during fast side-to-side lateral motion and transitions.

In general, an athlete can generate power in two ways: (1) using his own body weight, or (2) pushing or throwing something heavy.

Plyometric movements are one of the easiest and most effective ways for athletes to generate and increase power. The lateral plyometric jump is one exercise that primarily uses an athlete’s body weight to generate power.

Before doing the lateral plyometric jumps, a good place for athletes to begin building lower body power is by doing simple agility drills (such as ladder drills and dot drills) then slowly build up to tuck jumps. Other good additions to the plyometric routine include: all-out sprints, stair running/bounding, and burpees.

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Plyometrics

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Plyometrics were originally designed for power athletes like sprinters, football players and gymnasts. According to Brian Mac, professional sports coach, your muscles achieve maximum power during eccentric contractions, or muscle lengthening. When you immediately follow an eccentric contraction with a concentric — or muscle-shortening — contraction, your muscle produces a greater force. This is called the stretch-shortening cycle. Plyometric training decreases the time between your eccentric and concentric contractions and improves your muscular speed and power.

Plyometric exercises require a lot of energy, because they are highly intense. They utilize the whole body and activate most muscle groups, therefore burning many calories in a single session and aiding in weight loss. The repetitive landing causes your entire leg muscles to contract, helping to improve overall tone and definition. Plyometrics combine strength training and cardiovascular exercise, allowing you to “kill two birds with one stone.

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Muscle Soreness

The mild muscle strain injury creates microscopic damage to the muscle fibers. Scientists believe this damage, coupled with the inflammation that accompanies these tears, causes the pain.

“The aches and pains should be minor,” says Carol Torgan, an exercise physiologist and fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, “and are simply indications that muscles are adapting to your fitness regimen.”

No one is immune to muscle soreness. Exercise neophytes and body builders alike experience delayed onset muscle soreness.

“Anyone can get cramps or DOMS, from weekend warriors to elite athletes,” says Torgan. “The muscle discomfort is simply a symptom of using your muscles and placing stresses on them that are leading to adaptations to make them stronger and better able to perform the task the next time.”

But for the deconditioned person starting out, this can be intimidating. People starting an exercise program need guidance, Torgan says.

“The big problem is with people that aren’t very fit and go out and try these things; they get all excited to start a new class and the instructors don’t tell them that they might get sore,” she says.

“To them they might feel very sore, and because they aren’t familiar with it, they might worry that they’ve hurt themselves. Then they won’t want to do it again.”

Letting them know it’s OK to be sore may help them work through that first few days without being discouraged.

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BFit Jumpers for Winter

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$60 per jumper plus a 10% discount off training sessions and packages for new BFit clients. Offer valid till end of July.2015
If you are not to keen on “BFit or BFat” for $9 more you can get your own custom made slogan put on the jumper instead.

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THE MORE YOU WORK OUT, THE MORE YOU’LL GROW

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This is one of the most damaging myths that ever reared its ugly head. 95% of the pros will tell you that the biggest bodybuilding mistake they ever made was to over-train–and this happened even when they were taking steroids. Imagine how easy it is for the natural athlete to overtrain! When you train your muscles too often for them to heal, the end-result is zero growth and perhaps even losses. Working out every day, if you’re truly using the proper amount of intensity, will lead to gross overtraining. A body part, worked properly, i.e. worked to complete, total muscular failure that recruited as many muscle fibers as physiologically possible, can take 5-10 days to heal.

To take it a step further, even working a different body part in the next few days might constitute overtraining. If you truly work your quads to absolute fiber-tearing failure, doing another power workout the next day that entails heavy bench-presses or deadlifts is going to, in all probability, inhibit gains. After a serious leg workout, your whole system mobilizes to heal and recover from the blow you’ve dealt it. How, then, can the body be expected to heal from an equally brutal workout the next day? It can’t, at least not without using some drugs to help deal with the catabolic processes going on in your body [and even they’re usually not enough .]

Learn to accept rest as a valuable part of your workout. You should probably spend as many days out of the gym as you do in it.

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